Internet censorship | references

References

Cc.logo.circle.svg This article incorporates licensed material from the OpenNet Initiative web site.[124]

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  113. ^ Note: Responses may not add up to 100% due to rounding in the original report.
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  124. ^ CC-BY-icon-80x15.png Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license, see the lower right corner of pages at the OpenNet Initiative web site