Post-structuralism

  • post-structuralism is either a continuation or a rejection of the intellectual project that preceded it—structuralism.[1] structuralism proposes that one may understand human culture by means of a structure—modeled on language (structural linguistics)—that differs from concrete reality and from abstract ideas—a "third order" that mediates between the two.[2] post-structuralist authors all present different critiques of structuralism, but common themes include the rejection of the self-sufficiency of structuralism, and an interrogation of the binary oppositions that constitute its structures.[3][4][5][6] writers whose works are often characterised as post-structuralist include: roland barthes, jacques derrida, michel foucault, gilles deleuze, judith butler, jean baudrillard, julia kristeva, and jürgen habermas[citation needed], although many theorists who have been called "post-structuralist" have rejected the label.[7]

  • post-structuralism and structuralism
  • history
  • major works
  • see also
  • references
  • sources
  • external links

Post-structuralism is either a continuation or a rejection of the intellectual project that preceded it—structuralism.[1] Structuralism proposes that one may understand human culture by means of a structure—modeled on language (structural linguistics)—that differs from concrete reality and from abstract ideas—a "third order" that mediates between the two.[2] Post-structuralist authors all present different critiques of structuralism, but common themes include the rejection of the self-sufficiency of structuralism, and an interrogation of the binary oppositions that constitute its structures.[3][4][5][6] Writers whose works are often characterised as post-structuralist include: Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Judith Butler, Jean Baudrillard, Julia Kristeva, and Jürgen Habermas[citation needed], although many theorists who have been called "post-structuralist" have rejected the label.[7]