Old French

  • old french
    franceis, françois, romanz
    pronunciation[fɾãntsəɪs], [fɾãntswe], [romãnts]
    regionnorthern france, parts of belgium (wallonia), scotland, england, ireland, principality of antioch, kingdom of cyprus
    eraevolved into middle french by the 14th century
    language family
    indo-european
    • italic
      • romance
        • western
          • gallo-romance
            • gallo-rhaetian
              • oïl
                • old french
    language codes
    fro
    iso 639-3fro
    oldf1239[1]
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    old french (franceis, françois, romanz; modern french: ancien français) was the language spoken in northern france from the 8th century to the 14th century. in the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or occitan language in the south of france. the mid-14th century is taken as the transitional period to middle french, the language of the french renaissance, specifically based on the dialect of the Île-de-france region.

    the place and area where old french was spoken natively roughly extended to the northern half of the kingdom of france and its vassals (including parts of the angevin empire, which during the 12th century remained under anglo-norman rule), and the duchies of upper and lower lorraine to the east (corresponding to modern north-eastern france and belgian wallonia), but the influence of old french was much wider, as it was carried to england and the crusader states as the language of a feudal elite and of commerce.[2]

  • areal and dialectal divisions
  • history
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Old French
Franceis, François, Romanz
Pronunciation[fɾãntsəɪs], [fɾãntswe], [romãnts]
Regionnorthern France, parts of Belgium (Wallonia), Scotland, England, Ireland, Principality of Antioch, Kingdom of Cyprus
Eraevolved into Middle French by the 14th century
Language codes
fro
ISO 639-3fro
oldf1239[1]
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Old French (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language in the south of France. The mid-14th century is taken as the transitional period to Middle French, the language of the French Renaissance, specifically based on the dialect of the Île-de-France region.

The place and area where Old French was spoken natively roughly extended to the northern half of the Kingdom of France and its vassals (including parts of the Angevin Empire, which during the 12th century remained under Anglo-Norman rule), and the duchies of Upper and Lower Lorraine to the east (corresponding to modern north-eastern France and Belgian Wallonia), but the influence of Old French was much wider, as it was carried to England and the Crusader states as the language of a feudal elite and of commerce.[2]