LGBT rights in Europe

  • lgbt rights in europe.svg
         same-sex marriage

         civil unions      limited domestic recognition (cohabitation)      limited foreign recognition (residency rights)      no recognition      constitutional limit on marriage

         anti-propaganda laws
    statuslegal in all 51 states
    legal in all 6 dependencies and other territories
    gender identitylegal in 39 out of 51 states
    legal in 3 out of 6 dependencies and other territories
    militaryallowed to serve openly in 40 out of 47 states having an army
    allowed in all 6 dependencies and other territories
    discrimination protectionsprotected in 44 out of 51 states
    protected in all 6 dependencies and other territories
    family rights
    recognition of relationshipsrecognised in 28 out of 51 states
    recognised in all 6 dependencies and other territories
    restrictionssame-sex marriage constitutionally banned in 14 out of 51 states
    adoptionlegal in 22 out of 51 states
    legal in 5 out of 6 dependencies and other territories

    lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (lgbt) rights are widely diverse in europe per country. sixteen out of the 28 countries that have legalised same-sex marriage worldwide are situated in europe. a further twelve european countries have legalised civil unions or other forms of more limited recognition for same-sex couples.

    several european countries do not recognise any form of same-sex unions. marriage is defined as a union solely between a man and a woman in the constitutions of armenia, belarus, bulgaria, croatia, georgia, hungary, latvia, lithuania, moldova, montenegro, poland, serbia, slovakia and ukraine. of these, however, armenia recognises same-sex marriages performed abroad,[1] and croatia and hungary recognise same-sex partnerships. eastern europe is seen as having fewer legal rights and protections, worse living conditions, and less supportive public opinion for lgbt people than that in western europe.

    all european countries that allow marriage also allow joint adoption by same-sex couples, as does andorra. of the countries that have civil unions, none but andorra allow joint adoption, and only half allow step-parent adoption.

    the top three european countries in terms of lgbt equality according to ilga-europe are malta, belgium and luxembourg.[2][3] western europe is often regarded as being the most progressive region in the world for lgbt people to live in.

    legal status of adoption by same-sex couples in europe:
      joint adoption legal
      stepparent adoption legal
      no laws allowing adoption by same-sex couples
  • history
  • recent developments
  • public opinion around europe
  • legislation by country or territory
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

LGBT rights in Europe.svg
     Same-sex marriage

     Civil unions      Limited domestic recognition (cohabitation)      Limited foreign recognition (residency rights)      No recognition      Constitutional limit on marriage

     Anti-propaganda laws
StatusLegal in all 51 states
Legal in all 6 dependencies and other territories
Gender identityLegal in 39 out of 51 states
Legal in 3 out of 6 dependencies and other territories
MilitaryAllowed to serve openly in 40 out of 47 states having an army
Allowed in all 6 dependencies and other territories
Discrimination protectionsProtected in 44 out of 51 states
Protected in all 6 dependencies and other territories
Family rights
Recognition of relationshipsRecognised in 28 out of 51 states
Recognised in all 6 dependencies and other territories
RestrictionsSame-sex marriage constitutionally banned in 14 out of 51 states
AdoptionLegal in 22 out of 51 states
Legal in 5 out of 6 dependencies and other territories

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) rights are widely diverse in Europe per country. Sixteen out of the 28 countries that have legalised same-sex marriage worldwide are situated in Europe. A further twelve European countries have legalised civil unions or other forms of more limited recognition for same-sex couples.

Several European countries do not recognise any form of same-sex unions. Marriage is defined as a union solely between a man and a woman in the constitutions of Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Serbia, Slovakia and Ukraine. Of these, however, Armenia recognises same-sex marriages performed abroad,[1] and Croatia and Hungary recognise same-sex partnerships. Eastern Europe is seen as having fewer legal rights and protections, worse living conditions, and less supportive public opinion for LGBT people than that in Western Europe.

All European countries that allow marriage also allow joint adoption by same-sex couples, as does Andorra. Of the countries that have civil unions, none but Andorra allow joint adoption, and only half allow step-parent adoption.

The top three European countries in terms of LGBT equality according to ILGA-Europe are Malta, Belgium and Luxembourg.[2][3] Western Europe is often regarded as being the most progressive region in the world for LGBT people to live in.

Legal status of adoption by same-sex couples in Europe:
  Joint adoption legal
  Stepparent adoption legal
  No laws allowing adoption by same-sex couples