Human rights in Israel

  • human rights in israel refers to human rights in the state of israel both legally and in practice. the subject has been evaluated by intergovernmental organizations, non-governmental organizations (ngos) and human rights activists, often in the context of the israeli–palestinian conflict, the wider arab–israeli conflict and israel internal politics.

    israel is a multiparty parliamentary democracy. it was described in its declaration of independence as a "jewish state"[1] – the legal definition "jewish and democratic state" was adopted in 1985. in addition to its jewish majority, israel is home to religious and ethnic minorities, some of whom report discrimination. in the palestinian territories, successive israeli governments have been subject to international criticism from other countries as well as international human rights groups. one of the basic laws of israel, intended to form the basis of a future constitution,[2] basic law: human dignity and liberty, is a major tool for safeguarding human rights and civil liberties in the state of israel.

    israel is seen as being more politically free and democratic than neighboring countries in the middle east.[3] according to the 2015 us department of state's country reports on human rights practices, israel faces significant human rights problems regarding institutional discrimination of arab citizens of israel (many of whom self-identify as palestinian), ethiopian israelis and women, and the treatment of refugees and irregular migrants. other human rights problems include institutional discrimination against non-orthodox jews and intermarried families, and labor rights abuses against foreign workers.[4]

  • history
  • status of freedom, political rights and civil liberties in israel
  • welfare
  • right to privacy
  • women's rights
  • lgbt rights
  • ethnic minorities, anti-discrimination and immigration laws
  • education
  • migrant workers
  • people with disabilities
  • human trafficking
  • privatization and human rights
  • human rights in the occupied territories
  • attitudes towards israel by human rights organizations, the media, and academia
  • government attitude toward ngos and activists
  • see also
  • external links
  • references

Human rights in Israel refers to human rights in the State of Israel both legally and in practice. The subject has been evaluated by intergovernmental organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and human rights activists, often in the context of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict, the wider Arab–Israeli conflict and Israel internal politics.

Israel is a multiparty parliamentary democracy. It was described in its Declaration of Independence as a "Jewish state"[1] – the legal definition "Jewish and democratic state" was adopted in 1985. In addition to its Jewish majority, Israel is home to religious and ethnic minorities, some of whom report discrimination. In the Palestinian territories, successive Israeli governments have been subject to international criticism from other countries as well as international human rights groups. One of the Basic Laws of Israel, intended to form the basis of a future constitution,[2] Basic Law: Human Dignity and Liberty, is a major tool for safeguarding human rights and civil liberties in the State of Israel.

Israel is seen as being more politically free and democratic than neighboring countries in the Middle East.[3] According to the 2015 US Department of State's Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, Israel faces significant human rights problems regarding institutional discrimination of Arab citizens of Israel (many of whom self-identify as Palestinian), Ethiopian Israelis and women, and the treatment of refugees and irregular migrants. Other human rights problems include institutional discrimination against non-Orthodox Jews and intermarried families, and labor rights abuses against foreign workers.[4]