Freedom of information

  • free speech flag, from the hd dvd aacs case.

    freedom of information is an extension of freedom of speech, a fundamental human right recognized in international law, which is today understood more generally as freedom of expression in any medium, be it orally, in writing, print, through the internet or through art forms.[1] this means that the protection of freedom of speech as a right includes not only the content, but also the means of expression.[2] freedom of information is a separate concept which sometimes comes into conflict with the right to privacy in the content of the internet and information technology. as with the right to freedom of expression, the right to privacy is a recognized human right and freedom of information acts as an extension to this right.[3] lastly, freedom of information can include opposition to patents, opposition to copyrights or opposition to intellectual property in general.[4] the international and united states pirate party have established political platforms based largely on freedom of information issues.[5]

  • in law
  • internet and information technology
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Freedom of information is an extension of freedom of speech, a fundamental human right recognized in international law, which is today understood more generally as freedom of expression in any medium, be it orally, in writing, print, through the Internet or through art forms.[1] This means that the protection of freedom of speech as a right includes not only the content, but also the means of expression.[2] Freedom of information is a separate concept which sometimes comes into conflict with the right to privacy in the content of the Internet and information technology. As with the right to freedom of expression, the right to privacy is a recognized human right and freedom of information acts as an extension to this right.[3] Lastly, freedom of information can include opposition to patents, opposition to copyrights or opposition to intellectual property in general.[4] The international and United States Pirate Party have established political platforms based largely on freedom of information issues.[5]