Anarchism

  • anarchism is a radical political movement that is highly skeptical towards authority and rejects all forms of unjust hierarchy. it calls for the abolition of the state which it holds to be undesirable, unnecessary, and harmful. anarchism advocates for the replacement of the state with stateless societies or other forms of free associations.

    anarchism's timeline stretches back to prehistory when people lived in anarchistic societies long before the establishment of formal states, kingdoms or empires. with the rise of organised hierarchical bodies, skepticism towards authority also rose, but it was not until the 19th century a self-conscious political movement was formed. during the latest half of 19th and the first decades of 20th century, the anarchist movement flourished to most parts of the world, and had a significant role in worker's struggles for emancipation. various branches of anarchism were espoused during those times. anarchists took part in several revolutions, most notably in the spanish civil war, where they were crushed by the fascists forces in 1939, marking the end of the classical era of anarchism. in the latest decades of the 20th century, the anarchist movement nonetheless became relevant and vivid once more.

    anarchism employ various tactics in order to meet their ideal ends; these can be broadly separated in revolutionary and evolutionary tactics. there is significant overlap between the two legs which are merely descriptive. revolutionary tactics aim to bring down authority and state, and have taken a violent turn in the past. evolutionary tactics aim to prefigure what an anarchist society would be like. anarchism's thought, criticism and praxis has played a part in diverse fields of human society.

  • etymology, terminology, and definition
  • history
  • thought
  • tactics
  • key issues
  • criticism
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Anarchism is a radical political movement that is highly skeptical towards authority and rejects all forms of unjust hierarchy. It calls for the abolition of the state which it holds to be undesirable, unnecessary, and harmful. Anarchism advocates for the replacement of the state with stateless societies or other forms of free associations.

Anarchism's timeline stretches back to prehistory when people lived in anarchistic societies long before the establishment of formal states, kingdoms or empires. With the rise of organised hierarchical bodies, skepticism towards authority also rose, but it was not until the 19th century a self-conscious political movement was formed. During the latest half of 19th and the first decades of 20th century, the anarchist movement flourished to most parts of the world, and had a significant role in worker's struggles for emancipation. Various branches of anarchism were espoused during those times. Anarchists took part in several revolutions, most notably in the Spanish Civil War, where they were crushed by the fascists forces in 1939, marking the end of the classical era of anarchism. In the latest decades of the 20th century, the anarchist movement nonetheless became relevant and vivid once more.

Anarchism employ various tactics in order to meet their ideal ends; these can be broadly separated in revolutionary and evolutionary tactics. There is significant overlap between the two legs which are merely descriptive. Revolutionary tactics aim to bring down authority and state, and have taken a violent turn in the past. Evolutionary tactics aim to prefigure what an anarchist society would be like. Anarchism's thought, criticism and praxis has played a part in diverse fields of human society.